Dr. Henry Jenkins: 2018 Unconference Keynote Speaker

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm at the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


The CSUN Department of English is thrilled to host Dr. Henry Jenkins as the Keynote Speaker for the 2018 Politics of Participation in Popular Culture Unconference!
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The Provost Professor of Communications, Journalism, Cinematic Arts and Education at USC, Dr. Jenkins specializes in Fan Studies/Participation Culture and Popular Culture. He has written and/or edited 17 books including the recent By Any Media Necessary: The New Youth Activism. He is the creator of the Comparative Studies MA program at MIT and is currently the Principal Investigator for the Civic Imagination Project, A project that aims “to explore ways to inspire creative collaborations within communities as they work together to identify shared values and visions for the future” and is funded by the MacArthur Foundation.

For more information about Dr. Jenkins, his research, his writing, and his current projects, please visit his website and check out his impressive bio: Who The &%&# Is Henry Jenkins? and don’t forget to follow him on Twitter @henryjenkins

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Introducing the Panelists for “The Jedi Council”

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm in the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


Presenting “The Jedi Council,”  A Star Wars-themed panel! The following panelists will examine Star Wars from a variety of perspectives!

The Jedi Council:
Moderated by Dr. Charles Hatfield


“Darth Vader and Disability” — Ashley Aminian

ASHLEYAshley Aminian, born and raised in South Lake Tahoe, California, finds herself studying in the San Fernando Valley where she actually loves all the valley girls, and boys, she meets. She has spent the last year with Darth Vader, her adolescent crush turned adult muse, as she writes about Star Wars, Darth Vader, and disability. She will attend USC this summer in hopes of getting a teaching job that will allow her to see the eye doctor (pun intended).


“Darth Vader: Voices in the Mind of the Fallen” — Leonard MorenoLeonard Moreno

Leonard is 23 years of age and has been going to CSUN for almost 5 years. He is on track to graduate in the Fall of 2018 with a BA in ESM and a Minor in Psychology and plans to teach middle school English. Leonard is also active in the pop culture discourse and on social media with his weekly podcast: ScrubClub Podcast, where he collaborates with his friends and family from high school and college to cover new events in gaming, movies, comics and pop culture in general.  He is also a writer of fiction and is currently working on a book for publication.


“The Personal Redemption of A War Criminal or the Bourgeois Politics of Star Wars”
Ross Brummet

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Ross Brummet is a graduate student at California State, Northridge, who will receive his Masters in English Literature in May 2018. Informed by an intersectional approach that combines traditional Marxian analysis with feminist and postcolonial theory, his current research explores how popular canonical and non-canonical eighteenth-century literature responded to the rise of modern capitalism. More broadly, his interests include Sci-fi, speculative fiction and issues of empire in popular culture.


Nameless/Faceless: Examining Social Hierarchies in the Star Wars Universe
— Malinda Hackett

M Hackett PhotoMalinda Hackett is a first year graduate student in the English Department at Cal State Northridge. She plans on furthering her education and work by gaining admission into a doctoral program which focuses on both creative and scholarly writing. Topics of interest include noir, feminist crime fiction, spatial and urban theory, Gothic studies, gender studies, and pop culture.

Introducing the Panelists for “Politics of Communication in Media”

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm in the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


Presenting the “Politics of Communication in Media,” a panel that focuses on multimedia representations from stage to screen to digital communication!

Politics of Communication in Media

Moderated by Dr. Sandra Stanley


“are you there?: Digital Communication and the Epistolary Form in YA Literature” — Annabelle Bonebrake

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Annabelle Bonebrake is an avid agnostic and thirdspace spelunker. She will be graduating from CSUN this Spring with a BA in English and a single subject teaching credential.


“What’s Funny?: Humor, Satire, and Social Commentary in American Pop-Culture” — Anastasia Prizing

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Anastasia Prinzing studies literature and rhetoric in the M.A. English program at California State University Northridge. Her research interests include political satire, social commentary, allegorical fiction, and eighteenth-century literature. She also works as an editor and critical analyst on bulletin and newsletter publications.


“You Say You Want a Revolution: Language, Politics, and Pedagogy in Hamilton”                  — Kathy Stotter

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Kathy Stotter is in her last semester at CSUN, graduating with an MA in Literature. Her previous graduate study was at Teachers College at Columbia University in New York. Kathy teaches Fundamentals of Composition, Composition and Reading and College Research Skills at Santa Barbara City College. She plans to continue her studies in hopes of eventually earning a Ph.D.

Introducing the Panelists for “Witches Representing Hogwarts”

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm in the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


Presenting “Witches Representing Hogwarts” a Harry Potter Focused Roundtable that will examine the Harry Potter series from every angle!

Witches Representing Howarts:

Moderated by Dr. Colleen Tripp

“Representations of Consent and Agency in Harry Potter” — Caitlin Postalecpostal

Caitlin Postal is a PhD student in English at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on readership practices and representations of identity in medieval literature through a methodological approach that combines bibliographic and textual studies with innovative digital humanities tools. Caitlin is especially invested in creating digital editions and archives of predigital texts. She has a secondary interest in fan and pop culture studies, specifically the rhetoric and texuality of cosplay, inspired by her own experiences in the costuming world. She holds an M.A. in English from California State University Northridge and a B.A. in English from Westmont College.


“Harry Potter and the Poltergeist’s Place” — Maseri Kisa Schultz

IMG_0285Kisa is pursuing a Master’s in Literature and a single-subject teaching credential in English here at CSUN. She spends most of her life on campus, either running into her friends in the library and not doing her work, or helping her students (and therefore not doing her work). In all seriousness, she loves being a student and loves working with students. Kisa’s non-academic interests predominantly revolve around Star Wars, Marvel films, and Lord of the Rings.


“Unafraid of Toil: Power and Labor at Hogwarts” — Joyce McGee Brummetclone tag: 7332830379289168059

Joyce McGee Brummet is graduating from CSUN with a BA in English this May. She plans to pursue her MA in Literature, along with a multi-subject teaching credential on the path to her goal of teaching elementary school. Her current research looks at the role of magic in systems of inclusion and exclusion in Fantasy. Her areas of interest include Speculative Fiction, Children’s lit, and American Literature. She looks forward to the coming Singularity and she is a really big Harry Potter fan–she promises.


“Female Archetypes in Gryffindor House” –Vanessa Lopez

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Vanessa López studies literature here at CSUN.  She transferred here in Fall of 2017.  After graduation, she would like to explore rhetoric and composition.

Introducing the Panelists for “Exploring Cinematic Literacy”

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm at in the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


Presenting “Exploring Cinematic Literacy,” a panel focused on explorations of scientific futures!

Exploring Cinematic Literacy

Moderated by: Dr. Steven Wexler


“”To Infinity and …?” A Genre Exploration of Science Fiction Posters as They Chronicle American Society” — Jade Arvizu

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Jade is an English Master’s student graduating at the end of the Spring semester. As a true California girl, Jade grew up in Los Angeles where she completed her undergraduate work in English at UCLA and her M.A. emphasis is in Rhetoric and Composition at CSUN.  After graduation, she will marry the love of her life and, hopefully, will be spending the next year traveling and teaching English abroad.


“‘Carriers’ of the Collaborative Afrofuture: Tananarive Due’s Politics of Hope” — Patrick Lewisimage1Hailing from Greensboro, North Carolina, Patrick Lewis earned his B.A. in Film Studies from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington before migrating to Los Angeles.  En route to attaining his M.A. in English (Literature) at CSUN, Patrick has served as a Supplemental Instructor, Freshman Writing Lab Tutor, Writing Center Consultant, and Teaching Associate for Freshman Composition.  Research interests include sci-fi and fantasy media and its intersections with politics and current events.


“In and Out of Agency: The Politics of Costuming the Mockingjay” — Sawsan FarrukhSAWSANSawsan Farrukh is a Graduate student studying English Literature.  Her interests in the field include postcolonial, Gothic, and ethnic literature.  This is her final semester in the program and will be graduating in May.

Introducing the Panelists for “How to Get Creativity to Flow”

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm in the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


Presenting “How to Get Creativity to Flow,” a Creative-Writing focused panel featuring Creative writers and the Creative Process!

How to Get Creativity To Flow
Moderator: Dr. Chris Higgs


“Victorian Spam: A Book of Letters” — Katharine Coldiron Masoncoldiron

Katharine Coldiron Mason has published criticism, essays, and fiction in Ms., the Guardian, LARB, the Rumpus, VIDA, and elsewhere. She earned an MA in creative writing from CSUN and a bachelor’s degree from Mount Holyoke College. She has read many, many books.


“The Writing Process and Workshop Method” — Northridge Creative Writing CircleNCWC LogoThe Northridge Creative Writing Circle is more than a club. It seeks to build a community of writers and friendships that exist beyond the walls of CSUN by encouraging writers of various backgrounds to use the power of the written word to inspire and change the world. NCWC is a safe place to share your work, listen to others, and to make connections in the writing community and they workshop creative works of all genres at their club meetings.

 

Introducing the Panelists for “Intersections of Film and Literature”

The Politics of Participation Un-Conference will be held from 10:30 am to 3:00 pm in the East Conference Center at the CSUN University Student Union, Saturday April 14th


Presenting “Intersections of Film and Literature” The Honors Program Panel exploring Film and Literature!

Intersections of Film and Literature

Moderator: Dr. Colleen Tripp


“The Wand Chooses the Wizard: Goblins and the Limits of Social Justice in the World of Harry Potter” —Joyce McGee Brummetclone tag: 7332830379289168059

Joyce McGee Brummet is graduating from CSUN with a BA in English this May. She plans to pursue her MA in Literature, along with a multi-subject teaching credential on the path to her goal of teaching elementary school. Her current research looks at the role of magic in systems of inclusion and exclusion in Fantasy. Her areas of interest include Speculative Fiction, Children’s lit, and American Literature. She looks forward to the coming Singularity and she is a really big Harry Potter fan–she promises.


Unbalance in the Force of Genre: Defining the Fantasy Genre through Villains in Star Wars” — Karina Schink
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Karina Schink is a graduating senior at CSUN, majoring in English Literature in the Honors option. As a creative writer, she has always been interested in the mechanics of a story, and over her academic career has dedicated her time to research that. Upon graduation, she plans on continuing to work in the creative field while also working on her own writing.


Complications to Coupling: The Oedipus Complex in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca“– Samantha Wallace

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Samantha Wallace is a senior and an Honors in English Major. Samantha, in her current project, entitled “Complications to Coupling: The Oedipus Complex in Hitchcock’s Rebecca,” uses psychoanalytic theory to explore the ways in which Maxim and the second Mrs. de Winter are prevented from fully forming a romantic relationship.  Samantha’s other research interests include: Postcolonial Studies, Mixed-Race Studies, Asian American Studies, and 19th Century British Literature

Announcing Sigma Tau Delta’s Unconference Schedule!

We have finalized our schedule for our “Politics of Participating in Popular Culture” Conference! Keep scrolling for the full schedule!

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Politics of Participation in Popular Culture
Un-Conference Schedule

10:00 AM – 3:00 PM – Pre-registration/Coffee/Conference Lounge
Burbank Room, East Conference Center

11:00 AM – 11:50 PM – Keynote Presentation: Dr. Henry Jenkins
Bianchi Planetarium

12:10 – 1:00 PM

Panel 1: Intersections of Film and Literature La Crescenta Room, East Conference Center
Moderator: Dr. Colleen Tripp

“The Wand Chooses the Wizard: Goblins and the Limits of Social Justice in the World of Harry Potter” —Joyce McGee Brummet

“Unbalance in the Force of Genre: Defining the Fantasy Genre through Villains in Star Wars” —Karina Schink

“Complications to Coupling: The Oedipus Complex in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca—Samantha Wallace

Panel 2: How to Get Creativity to Flow Tujunga Room, East Conference Center
Moderator: Dr. Chris Higgs

“Victorian Spam: A Book of Letters” —Katharine Mason

“The Writing Process and Workshop Method” —Northridge Creative Writing Circle

1:10 – 2:00 PM

Panel 3: Exploring Cinematic Literacy La Crescenta Room, East Conference Center
Moderator: Dr. Steven Wexler

“To Infinity and …? A Genre Exploration of Science Fiction Posters as They Chronicle American Society” —Jade Arvizu

“Carriers of the Collaborative Afrofuture: Tananarive Due’s Politics of Hopes”—Patrick Lewis

“In and Out of Agency: The Politics of Costuming the Mockingjay” —Sawsan Farrukh

Panel 4: Witches Representing Hogwarts Tujunga Room, East Conference Center
Moderator: Dr. Colleen Tripp

“Representations of Consent and Agency in Harry Potter” —Caitlin Postale

Harry Potter and the Poltergeist’s Place” —Maseri Kisa Schultz

“Unafraid of Toil: Power and Labor at Hogwarts” —Joyce McGee Brummet

“Female Archetypes in Gryffindor House” –Vanessa Lopez

2:10 – 3:00 PM

Panel 5: “Politics of Communication in Media” La Crescenta Room, East Conference Center
Moderator: Dr. Sandra Stanley

“are you there?: Digital Communication and the Epistolary Form in YA Literature”—Annabelle Bonebrake

“What’s Funny? Humor, Satire, and Social Commentary in American Pop-Culture”—Anastasia Prinzing

“You Say You Want a Revolution: Language, Politics, and Pedagogy in Hamilton—Kathy Stotter

Panel 6: “The Jedi Council” Tujunga Room, East Conference Center
Moderator: Dr. Charles Hatfield

“Darth Vader and Disability” —Ashley Aminian

“Darth Vader: Voices in the Mind of the Fallen” —Leonard Moreno

“The Personal Redemption of a War Criminal Or the Bourgeois Politics of Star Wars—Ross Brummet

“Nameless/Faceless: Examining Social Hierarchies in the Star Wars Universe” —Malinda Hackett

Presenting in a Conference Told by Krishna Narayanamurti

During our Spring Break, four CSUN English Graduate Students presented their research papers at a conference they were accepted in. Of those students, Krishna Narayanamurti willingly wrote to us about his experience presenting his paper “Jane Austen’s Gypsies: A Collision of Political and Aesthetic Forms in Emma” at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF). He also provided us some advice for student presenters to ease the stress of speaking in front of an audience.image1As Krishna notes from his experience, I made the mistake of wearing a blazer, trying to look more professorial, forgetting that Fullerton is actually hotter than Northridge and getting the jitters before presenting only makes you warmer. During my talk, I was constantly wiping sweat from my brow, which never looks good outside of a hot yoga class.

Other than the physical discomfort, the session went well. I tried to see the conference presentation as a way to test drive a work-in-progress and get input from peers, as suggested by Gregory Semenza in Graduate Study for the Twenty-First Century. Discussing a paper I’d originally written in a CSUN class for an audience of faculty and students from other universities, who weren’t already familiar with my idea, made the strong and weak spots more apparent, which will be invaluable as I develop the draft into my final project for the M.A. degree.

Semenza does advise aspiring scholars not to “waste time” with graduate student conferences and instead to aim for “real” ones that will carry more weight on your CV, but having done both student and professional conferences, I’d disagree. Any opportunities to practice your presentation skills, to get suggestions that might guide your research in useful directions, to meet other people with your interests and goals, and to otherwise improve your work are never a waste, especially when you’re just starting your career.

 

Tips for student presenters:

  • Something I saw other panelists do that I adopted and highly recommend is thanking the moderator of your panel and the group hosting the event when it’s your turn to speak. It’s a simple gesture but it makes you sound both professional and humble when you do it, rather than just diving into the paper/presentation as if it’s all only about you, you, you, which of course it is, but the attendees don’t need to know that. 😉
  • Visit the room where your panel will be held well before your session (the day before if possible or even just getting there very early the day of). Get a sense of the space, the technology available in the room (if needed), and where the audience will be sitting, so you will be more prepared and less nervous when the time comes.
  • Practice your talk with a timer and edit ruthlessly. I have gotten this advice from past student presenters and you probably have heard this too, but it bears repeating. If you only have 15 minutes to speak and your paper is 10 pages, that is probably about 20 minutes if you are reading verbatim (approx. 2 mins/page), and thus, too long! Adapt your paper to a live talk and condense or skip sections that you can elaborate on further during Q&A if asked for more evidence/clarification.

 

Reviving Sigma Tau Delta’s Blog

Hello everyone!

It’s been a while since Sigma Tau Delta has written on this blog, and the current board members are diligently working to create an online presence to represent California State University, Northridge. Go, Matadors!

We hope to build off of the previous blogs, but of course, everyone has their own approach to writing and we will NOT be able to replicate the past Sigma Tau Delta blogger. That being said, expect to see more posts about Iota Chi and their adventures.

We do hope to introduce our current (Fall ’17- Spring ’18) Sigma Tau Delta Iota Chi’s board members as well as welcoming new board members for Fall ’18-Spring ’19.

In the meantime, hang on tightly as we boost our audience on other social media platforms.

Be sure to follow @SigmaTauCSUN on ALL social media platforms!

-SigmaTauCSUN